fbpx

Sperm Donor Information

The Rewards of Becoming a Donor with A Perfect Match

 

Give the Gift of Life

Help create or expand a family that could not exist without the effort and kindness of a sperm donor.

Financial

Earn compensation that can be used to help finance educational goals, pay off debt, travel or help achieve other personal goals.

Compassionate Support

We know the time and effort it takes to commit to the entire process of becoming a sperm donor, and we treat all our donors with the care and the respect they deserve.

Understanding

Donors learn more about their own fertility and genetics through the medical screening process.

Choosing a genetic contributor for your child is a very personal decision and is different for everyone. We have intended parents seeking a variety of characteristics in their donor, so we encourage anyone who is interested in sperm donation to apply.

About Us

Who Are We?

A Perfect Match is one of the oldest, most experienced and trusted donor agencies in the United States, matching donors with families since the year 2000. We are located in southern California, but we are not limited to only working with donors or clinics only in our area. We work with donors and intended parents located throughout the U.S. and internationally.

A Perfect Match works with individual families who have medical conditions leading to infertility, as well as same-sex couples and individuals who can’t create their family without the help of a kind and generous donor. As a matching agency, we act as the liaison between clinics, intended parents and donors. Our professional team works closely with our donors to provide a service that is focused on you, the donor, as an individual. We know the time and effort it takes to commit to the entire process of becoming a sperm donor, and we treat all our donors with the care and the respect they deserve.

We also offer private advertising as an additional service to intended parents who have a unique need and haven’t been able to find a donor through us or other agencies. We never advertise for a compensation amount that is not a legitimate offer. All donors who have been selected by our advertising families have received the exact amount offered.

"....from beginning to end, someone is always there to walk you through the entire process. They are supportive, giving, compassionate, and thoughtful."

- A. Victorville, CA

Compensation

Using the example of a $10,000 compensation, here is the breakdown of payments issued.

Installment #1

$1000.00 paid when donor does local semen analysis (not to be frozen or used for procreation) genetic testing and psychological screening.

Installment #2

$2000.00 paid for FDA screening and first donation.  This donation may be used by the family for procreation use or frozen.

Installment #3

$3000.00 paid when donor completes second donation (2-3 days after 1st donation).  This donation may be used by the family for procreation use or frozen.

Installment #4

$4000.00 paid upon completion of second FDA required screening (approximately 1 month after first donation.)

Compensation for sperm donation can vary, and here is why:

At A Perfect Match, we do not set the compensation for any of our sperm donors. The average fee for a first-time sperm donor is between $5,000 - $10,000 (plus travel expenses); However, private ad sperm donors, and sperm donors who agree to exclusive donation may request a higher compensation. A donor’s requested compensation is noted on his online profile.

Just as we do not set a sperm donor’s fee, neither do we force intended parents to agree to the sperm donor’s requested fee. We will present every reasonable offer to the sperm donor and allow him to decide on compensation. Although we will help facilitate compensation negotiations between the parties, the sperm donor and intended parents must make all final decisions.

We also offer private advertising as an additional service to intended parents who have a unique need and haven’t been able to find a donor through us or other agencies. We never advertise for a compensation amount that is not a legitimate offer. All donors who have been selected by our advertising families received the exact amount offered.

Types of Donation

Know your options

As you consider types of donations, we invite you to visit "We Are Donor Conceived" to learn more about real life stories from donor conceived people and some donors themselves.

Directed Donation or Identified Donations (also known as Open Donation)

Directed donation is when the parties may already know each other personally (family or friend) so they share contact information and sign all agreements with full names. Identified Donation is between parties who did not know one another previously but agree to share some or all identifying and contact information with one another. Identified donation may be a choice of the parties, or it may be that due to the donor’s FDA eligibility to donate the parties may be required by the IVF clinic to have a level of shared contact information in order to work together. Identified donation should be used only by those comfortable with having some level of contact and sharing some or all of their identifying information with the other parties. Some clinics require the parties to sign all consents and agreements with full names, addresses, etc. Others may only require the parties meet in person, by video chat or phone and share names. The criterion for Identified donation is a clinic decision, not an agency decision, and requirements will vary from clinic to clinic. As an agency, A Perfect Match has no control over whether in the future the parties will respect agreed upon boundaries, respect the privacy of the other party, or if they will remain in touch over time.

Identified or Open donation requirements may include any or all of these:

A phone conversation between intended parents and donor in which full names are shared, or a phone conversation or personal meetings in which all personal contact information is shared, including phone numbers and emails.

More identifying and contact information shared between the parties, but the information is also added to all legal contracts and/or consent forms.

If a surrogate is involved, any or all the above may apply to all parties—or it may mean that only the donor and surrogate must meet the requirements to be known to one another and share information.

Semi-open Donation or Limited Identification Donation

This type of donation is a compromise between being fully known and not known at all. Semi-open donation is when intended parents and the donor agree to share limited identifying information at time of match, but the parties decide they will share limited personal contact and identifying information once the retrieval is completed and there is a known pregnancy/birth.

Semi-open donations are common when the parties agree that a future meeting between the child and donor is important. In addition, all parties agree to maintain periodic contact with each other either directly, through the agency, or through a third party to receive yearly medical updates until the time of meeting occurs. Semi-open donation doesn’t necessarily mean ongoing direct contact between the parties is required or desired. A third-party intermediary such as the Donor Sibling Registry may be chosen as the primary contact for future medical updates and messages.

Semi-open donation is now recommended by most mental health professionals in this industry, and it can be a wonderful option if all parties agree on the level of contact and appropriate personal boundaries before personal information is shared. While we find that this is a wonderful option for many, and most parties show true concern and respect for the other, APM cannot guarantee that parties will adhere to boundaries, remain in touch, or will respect the privacy of the other.

Anonymous or Non-Identified Donation

Anonymous donation is the most common type of donation when working through a sperm bank. Due to the advances in technology, however, the risk of being identified in the future is high. Anonymity, no matter how one may try, is not guaranteed to a donor or a donor child.

Until recently, sperm donation was very secretive and donors, intended parents, and even the children created were able to be completely anonymous…or so they thought! With the advances of science, DNA testing, and face recognition software, it is no longer a question of “IF” a donor can but found, but it is now “WHEN and HOW” that can/will happen.

An anonymous/non-identified donation contractual agreement does not preclude a family from asking the donor to meet the child in the future. Mental health professionals agree that it is in the best interest of the child created through donation to have access to medical information and access to the donor in the future, and it is highly encouraged that all donors agree to meet a child at age 18 or upon other agreement. You can control the narrative to some degree as to when and how that will happen. If, however, you never want to be contacted by a child, you should not become a sperm donor. Remember, this is about the well-being of a child – not you!

We see the term ‘non-identified’ now being used to describe a relationship in which Intended parents and their donor share no personal contact or other identifying information with each other—in fact, they may even choose to be identified in the contract by only a number or alias. All donors are asked to remain in touch with any medical, genetic, or mental health changes that could affect a child. This may be done through a professional registry, (Donor Sibling Registry is one) the agency, or an attorney.

All Types of Donations

Identified, Semi-Open or Non-Identified, all parties need to understand the responsibility to share medical, genetic, or mental health information that can affect the child created through donation, or your right to be informed of any information learned that could affect your own future children. Parties should agree to maintain and update personal contact information through the agency or other third party, such as the Donor Sibling Registry, but an agreement should be made on how to share important information with the other party during the legal contract stage of a cycle.

Communication

Understanding the options for communication and contact between a sperm donor and intended parents

communication by phone

Phone Call

We use a confidential conference line when intended parents and donors want to speak with one another but do not wish to share their contact information.

Show More

This is an excellent option for those who do not want their personal and confidential information shared or are undecided about having the child and donor meet in the future.

Our match coordinator will make the initial introductions and remain available to answer any questions. These conversations generally last 15 to 30 minutes. Most people enjoy such personal contact and consequently choose to work together after experiencing this level of communication.

Video Chat

Most people enjoy this more personal approach to an introduction and appreciate the convenience of participants being able to…

Show More

attend a video chat while at separate locations. We ask all parties to create a new (free) Skype account whose name masks identifying information. If you already have such a Skype account, you may use this for the meeting. No personal contact information is shared at this time.

We will arrange a meeting day and time convenient to all and will be available during the chat to make introductions and answer any questions.

In Person Meeting

We accommodate personal face-to-face meetings between the parties, though with some restrictions. Since such a meeting is much more…

Show More

intimate, a conference call or video chat is required first, followed by a tentative commitment to work together. Any costs associated with an in-person meeting are the intended parents’ responsibility.

In-person meetings are less frequent than other modes of communication, typically used by those who desire future contact between the donor and child—and often prefer ongoing contact directly with each other. Most people tell us that an in-person meeting is a very positive and comfortable experience—more like meeting with a family member or friend. In-person meetings generally last an hour. Most people enjoy this much more personal contact with one another and consequently choose to work together after experiencing this level of communication.

..Most sperm donation cycles are non-identified—that is, there is no on-going and personal contact between the parties. However, many intended parents find it important to know they have chosen a donor who is kind and compatible with their family, in which case they may desire more connection with the donor than just a profile and photos provided by the database.

Whatever level of communication chosen by the parties, A Perfect Match is willing to facilitate and arrange for a level of contact between the parties that is positive for all involved. Whether you meet one another via phone call, video chat or personal meeting, it is a time for intended parents and donor to learn more about each other. It is not a time to discuss compensation or negotiate any contract terms. Nor is it a time to share any personal and confidential contact information, which occurs only after a legal contract is signed between the parties and a positive pregnancy result is achieved—and then only if all parties agree.

If, after a call, video chat, or in-person meeting, you feel more comfortable with a less personal donation, or a more personal donation, just let us know and A Perfect Match will accommodate the change. Remember, this is about your comfort level for donation.

Donor Screening & Eligibility

Understanding the basic requirements of a sperm donor

A Perfect Match carefully screens donor candidates for acceptance into the agency sperm donor program; the IVF center screens donor candidates to determine the final eligibility of men who meet federal, state, and IVF clinic criteria for undergoing a sperm donation.

Agency Screening

A Perfect Match conducts its own prescreening of donors for the sole purpose of determining acceptance into our donor program. Our donor prescreening includes the following:

  • A profile completed by donor
  • A genetic questionnaire completed by the donor
  • Photos of donor and donor’s family
  • Official test scores and transcripts.
  • Documents of donor’s personal identity—driver’s license, school ID, passport
  • Records of any previous donations (received directly from the IVF center)
  • Any other documentation deemed necessary to make APM’s final decision to list or not list a donor candidate in our program

When a donor is matched with an intended parent, we will provide the following to the IVF center:

  • Donor’s profile and genetic questionnaire provided to us by donor
  • Copy of donor’s driver’s license and photo
  • Any previous cycle records received from IVF centers
  • Psychological clearance (as applicable)

A Perfect Match does its best to select candidates based on our experience with IVF center donor criteria. If a candidate does not meet basic requirements, he is generally not accepted into our donor program due to the low chance the donor can pass the IVF clinic screening. However, the IVF center always makes the final determination of eligibility.

IVF Center Screening

Only an IVF center determines the final eligibility of the donor for sperm donation. Only an IVF center can provide or request medical and genetic testing and screening of the donor. Because each IVF center has its own donor criteria, a center requires a donor to complete its own documentation to determine the donor’s eligibility. The IVF center conducts a personal interview with the donor to obtain his family history, infectious disease history, and to complete a genetic risk assessment. This interview may be via video call or in person. All donor screening requirements—including medical, genetic, and psychological screenings—are determined by the IVF center. The following are required by most IVF centers:

Genetic Consult and Genetic Screening
The cost of a genetic consult is paid for by intended parents. The genetic counselor will discuss the findings with the donor. Some counselors will discuss the sperm donor’s consult with intended parents (without giving contact information) but others charge an additional fee to discuss the findings with intended parents, so it can be determined if the donor and intended parents share any potential genetic traits that could cause an issue for a child. Any genetic testing of the donor or the intended parents is determined by and ordered by the IVF center. You will have access to your test results.

Psychological Screening

This evaluation detects psychological issues of a donor, as well as ensures the sperm donor fully understands the long- term and emotional aspects of donation. Although all IVF centers require psychological screening of donors, some IVF centers have their own in-house psychologist to provide the testing and evaluation and he/she determines whether to accept the donor candidate. Centers that do not have their own psychologist on staff require this screening to be done by a licensed mental health professional acceptable to the IVF center. A previous evaluation may be accepted by the IVF center if it is less than a year old.

A PAI, MMPI, or similar personality assessment is conducted with the donor during as part of the psychological screening. The mental health professional will meet with the donor for a personal evaluation to discuss the donor’s history, his understanding of the sperm donation process, and his commitment to the process. (During COVID, testing may be done remotely, and evaluations may be done by phone or video chat) The mental health professional generates a written assessment of the donor’s psychological suitability for a donor cycle. This assessment is submitted to the IVF center for their final approval and determination of the donor’s eligibility, and APM receives a copy for our files. Intended parents will not receive the actual test results or assessment.

Medical Screening

This screening is performed by either the primary IVF center or a monitoring physician approved by the primary IVF center. The IVF physician will review the donor’s existing medical records and conduct a medical history interview. The medical screening will be based on the donor’s history and the IVF center’s specific protocol. A semen analysis will be required to determine the quality of the sperm and its ability to survive a freeze and thaw. The center will also do blood testing to determine whether the donor meets FDA eligibility requirements. To understand more about FDA eligibility, please read the following, which starts with section VI for gamete donors: www.fda.gov/media/73072/download

 

What are the qualifications for a donor?

A sperm donor must be of legal age and no older than 40 years old and be within normal BMI. He must have a good medical, mental health, and genetic family history. He must live a healthy lifestyle, must not have any drug or alcohol issues, must not be a smoke or vape, must not take medications not prescribed to him by a primary physician, and must practice safe sex techniques to prevent STDs. While not mandatory, most intended parents prefer the donor is in college or has a college education.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

What are the qualifications for a donor?

A sperm donor must be of legal age and no older than 40 years old and be within normal BMI.  He must have a good medical, mental health, and genetic family history.  He must live a healthy lifestyle, must not have any drug or alcohol issues, must not be a smokeor vape,  must not take medications not prescribed to him by a primary physician, and must practice safe sex techniques to prevent STDs.  While not mandatory, most intended parents prefer the donor is in college or has a college education.

How is a private match different than a match through a sperm bank?

Unlike a sperm bank that has anonymous donation and allows for the high rate of 25 families per geographic area, (they can ship your sperm elsewhere and the number will increase) our donors agree to limit the number of donations to no more than 6 families in total. Some donors prefer fewer donations or prefer a single exclusive donation. With a sperm bank, it isthe sperm bank that decides who has access and use of your specimen, but with A Perfect Match it is our donors decide who they will help.

Is a privately matched sperm donor legally responsible in any way for the child?

No, you are not a parent, nor do recipients want you to be a parent!   There is a legal contract that provides language and terms that absolve a donor of any legal or financial responsibility for a child created through the donation.  We do, however, believe there is a level of personal responsibility when someone donates.  We believe it is in the resulting child’s best interest that a donor continues to provide updated medical, genetic, and psychological information, and that the donor is willing to meet/speak with a child who is 18 years or older.

Will I be notified about the birth of a child resulting from my donation?

We believe every donor should know if the donation resulted in a child for purposes of his own family planning, but the exact terms will be determined at time of match and written into the legal contract.  As an agency, we encourage our families to at least let us and donor know of a birth and agree to provided updated medical and genetic issues, if any.  We want to be able to track births to limit the number of donations/children, but also so we can contact you should we learn of anything that may affect you or your own future children.

How much time does a donation require?

The actual time required for a local donation is generally 10-15 hours; however, the time to get results from all medical and genetic testing can take a few weeks.  Each donor must have an initial semen analysis, psychological evaluation and interview, genetic testing, infectious disease testing, medical screening, provide two additional samples for purposes of procreation for the family, and donor must do a follow up FDA infectious disease testing  approximately 30 days after the final donation.

What happens to any unused sperm?

Due to our agency policy and the belief that donations and number of children created through donation should be limited, unused sperm is destroyed once the recipient completes his/her/their family unless otherwise agreed upon by all parties.

What is a Non-Identified donor?

A non-identified donor is one that an intended parent may choose or may come from a sperm bank. Through our agency, a donor may still have a phone call or video chat with the intended parent, but the parties do not share any identifying information and the legal contract is written to state this. The term for non-identified donor used to be ‘anonymous’ but this is no longer possible due to DNA testing, facial recognition software, and internet searches. A donor who is classified as non-identified must understand his identity may be discovered later when the child becomes of legal age. With today’s DNA testing, it is possible that you and/or family members would be identified by a child by a simple cheek swab or blood draw whether you intended to be discovered or not. If you want to remain anonymous, donation may not be right for you.

What is the compensation for donation and how is it paid?

The average compensation paid to a first-time donor is $5-10,000, plus travel expenses if you are required to travel outside your home area for a donation. We will present every reasonable offer to the donor and allow the donor to make his own decision regarding compensation. Although APM will help facilitate compensation negotiations between the parties, it is the donor and intended parents who must make all final decisions.

Compensation (Example of $10,000) paid to donor in four installments:

 

Installment 1: $1000.00 paid when donor does local semen analysis (not to be frozen or used for procreation) genetic testing and psychological screening.

Installment 2: $2000.00 paid for FDA screening and first donation.

Installment 3: $3000.00 paid when donor completes second donation (2-3 days after 1st donation).

Installment 4: $4000.00 paid upon completion of second FDA required screening (approximately 1 month after first donation.)

What is a Known Donor or Identified Donor?

A known/directed/identified donor is one that an intended parent brings to the clinic for purposes of providing a sperm donation for use in procreation. A private match would be considered a directed donation. This type of donation must meet FDA requirements and specific requirements of the IVF clinic. The extent of how much identifying information must be shared by the parties is determined by the clinic and varies from clinic to clinic. The information shared could be as simple as sharing a phone call or video chat, or it could be as extensive as sharing full names and identifying information with one another on a legal contract. Many times, it means the sperm donor must be known to the surrogate. Before a match is finalized, you will know what is expected and you can determine if you are comfortable with the requirements.

Do I have to agree to meet a child in the future?

Intended parents choose a non-sperm bank donor because they want to have more information about the donor and so the child can meet the donor in the future.   Unless agreed upon by all parties at time of donation, your identifying information will be released to any child created from your donation who is at least 18 years old and makes a formal request for the information unless you notify us and the parent you don’t want it to be released.  Also, in this day of DNA testing and facial recognition software, a child will be able to find out who you are.  If you don’t want to be known to a child in the future, then donation through our program is not for you.

A Perfect Match
8340 Allison Avenue
La Mesa, CA 91942
619-464-1424